July 19, 2019  |  

PacBio SMRT assembly of a complex multi-replicon genome reveals chlorocatechol degradative operon in a region of genome plasticity.

We have sequenced a Burkholderia genome that contains multiple replicons and large repetitive elements that would make it inherently difficult to assemble by short read sequencing technologies. We illustrate how the integrated long read correction algorithms implemented through the PacBio Single Molecule Real-Time (SMRT) sequencing technology successfully provided a de novo assembly that is a reasonable estimate of both the gene content and genome organization without making any further modifications. This assembly is comparable to related organisms assembled by more labour intensive methods. Our assembled genome revealed regions of genome plasticity for further investigation, one of which harbours a chlorocatechol degradative operon highly homologous to those previously identified on globally ubiquitous plasmids. In an ideal world, this assembly would still require experimental validation to confirm gene order and copy number of repeated elements. However, we submit that particularly in instances where a polished genome is not the primary goal of the sequencing project, PacBio SMRT sequencing provides a financially viable option for generating a biologically relevant genome estimate that can be utilized by other researchers for comparative studies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.


July 19, 2019  |  

Discovery and biosynthesis of gladiolin: A Burkholderia gladioli antibiotic with promising activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

An antimicrobial activity screen of Burkholderia gladioli BCC0238, a clinical isolate from a cystic fibrosis patient, led to the discovery of gladiolin, a novel macrolide antibiotic with potent activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. Gladiolin is structurally related to etnangien, a highly unstable antibiotic from Sorangium cellulosum that is also active against Mycobacteria. Like etnangien, gladiolin was found to inhibit RNA polymerase, a validated drug target in M. tuberculosis. However, gladiolin lacks the highly labile hexaene moiety of etnangien and was thus found to possess significantly increased chemical stability. Moreover, gladiolin displayed low mammalian cytotoxicity and good activity against several M. tuberculosis clinical isolates, including four that are resistant to isoniazid and one that is resistant to both isoniazid and rifampicin. Overall, these data suggest that gladiolin may represent a useful starting point for the development of novel drugs to tackle multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The B. gladioli BCC0238 genome was sequenced using Single Molecule Real Time (SMRT) technology. This resulted in four contiguous sequences: two large circular chromosomes and two smaller putative plasmids. Analysis of the chromosome sequences identified 49 putative specialized metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters. One such gene cluster, located on the smaller of the two chromosomes, encodes a trans-acyltransferase (trans-AT) polyketide synthase (PKS) multienzyme that was hypothesized to assemble gladiolin. Insertional inactivation of a gene in this cluster encoding one of the PKS subunits abrogated gladiolin production, confirming that the gene cluster is responsible for biosynthesis of the antibiotic. Comparison of the PKSs responsible for the assembly of gladiolin and etnangien showed that they possess a remarkably similar architecture, obfuscating the biosynthetic mechanisms responsible for most of the structural differences between the two metabolites.


July 19, 2019  |  

PacBio but not Illumina technology can achieve fast, accurate and complete closure of the high GC, complex Burkholderia pseudomallei two-chromosome genome

Although PacBio third-generation sequencers have improved the read lengths of genome sequencing which facilitates the assembly of complete genomes, no study has reported success in using PacBio data alone to completely sequence a two-chromosome bacterial genome from a single library in a single run. Previous studies using earlier versions of sequencing chemistries have at most been able to finish bacterial genomes containing only one chromosome with de novo assembly. In this study, we compared the robustness of PacBio RS II, using one SMRT cell and the latest P6-C4 chemistry, with Illumina HiSeq 1500 in sequencing the genome of Burkholderia pseudomallei, a bacterium which contains two large circular chromosomes, very high G+C content of 68–69%, highly repetitive regions and substantial genomic diversity, and represents one of the largest and most complex bacterial genomes sequenced, using a reference genome generated by hybrid assembly using PacBio and Illumina datasets with subsequent manual validation. Results showed that PacBio data with de novo assembly, but not Illumina, was able to completely sequence the B. pseudomallei genome without any gaps or mis-assemblies. The two large contigs of the PacBio assembly aligned unambiguously to the reference genome, sharing >99.9% nucleotide identities. Conversely, Illumina data assembled using three different assemblers resulted in fragmented assemblies (201–366 contigs), sharing only 92.2–100% and 92.0–100% nucleotide identities to chromosomes I and II reference sequences, respectively, with no indication that the B. pseudomallei genome consisted of two chromosomes with four copies of ribosomal operons. Among all assemblies, the PacBio assembly recovered the highest number of core and virulence proteins, and housekeeping genes based on whole-genome multilocus sequence typing (wgMLST). Most notably, assembly solely based on PacBio outperformed even hybrid assembly using both PacBio and Illumina datasets. Hybrid approach generated only 74 contigs, while the PacBio data alone with de novo assembly achieved complete closure of the two-chromosome B. pseudomallei genome without additional costly bench work and further sequencing. PacBio RS II using P6-C4 chemistry is highly robust and cost-effective and should be the platform of choice in sequencing bacterial genomes, particularly for those that are well-known to be difficult-to-sequence.


July 7, 2019  |  

Burkholderia pseudomallei sequencing identifies genomic clades with distinct recombination, accessory, and epigenetic profiles.

Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) is the causative agent of the infectious disease melioidosis. To investigate population diversity, recombination, and horizontal gene transfer in closely related Bp isolates, we performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) on 106 clinical, animal, and environmental strains from a restricted Asian locale. Whole-genome phylogenies resolved multiple genomic clades of Bp, largely congruent with multilocus sequence typing (MLST). We discovered widespread recombination in the Bp core genome, involving hundreds of regions associated with multiple haplotypes. Highly recombinant regions exhibited functional enrichments that may contribute to virulence. We observed clade-specific patterns of recombination and accessory gene exchange, and provide evidence that this is likely due to ongoing recombination between clade members. Reciprocally, interclade exchanges were rarely observed, suggesting mechanisms restricting gene flow between clades. Interrogation of accessory elements revealed that each clade harbored a distinct complement of restriction-modification (RM) systems, predicted to cause clade-specific patterns of DNA methylation. Using methylome sequencing, we confirmed that representative strains from separate clades indeed exhibit distinct methylation profiles. Finally, using an E. coli system, we demonstrate that Bp RM systems can inhibit uptake of non-self DNA. Our data suggest that RM systems borne on mobile elements, besides preventing foreign DNA invasion, may also contribute to limiting exchanges of genetic material between individuals of the same species. Genomic clades may thus represent functional units of genetic isolation in Bp, modulating intraspecies genetic diversity. © 2015 Nandi et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.


July 7, 2019  |  

Complete genome sequences for 59 burkholderia isolates, both pathogenic and near neighbor.

The genus Burkholderia encompasses both pathogenic (including Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Category B listed), and nonpathogenic Gram-negative bacilli. Here we present full genome sequences for a panel of 59 Burkholderia strains, selected to aid in detection assay development. Copyright © 2015 Johnson et al.


July 7, 2019  |  

Complete genome sequence of Burkholderia cepacia strain LO6.

Burkholderia cepacia strain LO6 is a betaproteobacterium that was isolated from a cystic fibrosis patient. Here we report the 6.4 Mb draft genome sequence assembled into 2 contigs. This genome sequence will aid the transcriptomic profiling of this bacterium and help us to better understand the mechanisms specific to pulmonary infections. Copyright © 2015 Belcaid et al.


July 7, 2019  |  

Complete genome sequence of Burkholderia pyrrocinia 2327(T), the first industrial bacterium which produced antifungal antibiotic pyrrolnitrin.

Burkholderia pyrrocinia 2327(T) (=DSM 10685(T), having an origin history as a strain Fujisawa Pharm 2327(T) from Fujisawa Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.) is the first industrial bacterium for the isolation of antifungal antibiotic pyrrolnitrin. Herein, we present the first complete genome sequence of strain 2327(T), which consists of three circular chromosomes with one plasmid for the total 7,961,346bp sized genome with a GC content of 66.5%. This information will provide better understanding of molecular mechanisms in strain 2327(T), leading the insight of whole-cell system for the practical application of strain with the virtue of antibiotic capacity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


July 7, 2019  |  

Azotobacter genomes: The genome of Azotobacter chroococcum NCIMB 8003 (ATCC 4412).

The genome of the soil-dwelling heterotrophic N2-fixing Gram-negative bacterium Azotobacter chroococcum NCIMB 8003 (ATCC 4412) (Ac-8003) has been determined. It consists of 7 circular replicons totalling 5,192,291 bp comprising a circular chromosome of 4,591,803 bp and six plasmids pAcX50a, b, c, d, e, f of 10,435 bp, 13,852, 62,783, 69,713, 132,724, and 311,724 bp respectively. The chromosome has a G+C content of 66.27% and the six plasmids have G+C contents of 58.1, 55.3, 56.7, 59.2, 61.9, and 62.6% respectively. The methylome has also been determined and 5 methylation motifs have been identified. The genome also contains a very high number of transposase/inactivated transposase genes from at least 12 of the 17 recognised insertion sequence families. The Ac-8003 genome has been compared with that of Azotobacter vinelandii ATCC BAA-1303 (Av-DJ), a derivative of strain O, the only other member of the Azotobacteraceae determined so far which has a single chromosome of 5,365,318 bp and no plasmids. The chromosomes show significant stretches of synteny throughout but also reveal a history of many deletion/insertion events. The Ac-8003 genome encodes 4628 predicted protein-encoding genes of which 568 (12.2%) are plasmid borne. 3048 (65%) of these show > 85% identity to the 5050 protein-encoding genes identified in Av-DJ, and of these 99 are plasmid-borne. The core biosynthetic and metabolic pathways and macromolecular architectures and machineries of these organisms appear largely conserved including genes for CO-dehydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase and a soluble NiFe-hydrogenase. The genetic bases for many of the detailed phenotypic differences reported for these organisms have also been identified. Also many other potential phenotypic differences have been uncovered. Properties endowed by the plasmids are described including the presence of an entire aerobic corrin synthesis pathway in pAcX50f and the presence of genes for retro-conjugation in pAcX50c. All these findings are related to the potentially different environmental niches from which these organisms were isolated and to emerging theories about how microbes contribute to their communities.


July 7, 2019  |  

Draft genome sequences of Burkholderia contaminans, a Burkholderia cepacia complex species that is increasingly recovered from cystic fibrosis patients.

Burkholderia contaminans belongs to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), a group of bacteria that are ubiquitous in the environment and capable of infecting the immunocompromised and people with cystic fibrosis. We report here draft genome sequences for the B. contaminans type strain LMG 23361 and an Argentinian cystic fibrosis sputum isolate. Copyright © 2015 Bloodworth et al.


July 7, 2019  |  

High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Lebeckia ambigua-nodulating Burkholderia sp. strain WSM4176.

Burkholderia sp. strain WSM4176 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective N2-fixing root nodule of Lebeckia ambigua collected in Nieuwoudtville, Western Cape of South Africa, in October 2007. This plant persists in infertile, acidic and deep sandy soils, and is therefore an ideal candidate for a perennial based agriculture system in Western Australia. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain WSM4176, which represents a potential inoculant quality strain for L. ambigua, together with sequence and annotation. The 9,065,247 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in 13 scaffolds of 65 contigs, contains 8369 protein-coding genes and 128 RNA-only encoding genes, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project proposal (Project ID 882).


July 7, 2019  |  

Finished annotated genome sequence of Burkholderia pseudomallei strain Bp1651, a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate.

Burkholderia pseudomallei strain Bp1651, a human isolate, is resistant to all clinically relevant antibiotics. We report here on the finished genome sequence assembly and annotation of the two chromosomes of this strain. This genome sequence may assist in understanding the mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance for this pathogenic species. Copyright © 2015 Bugrysheva et al.


July 7, 2019  |  

Complete genome sequence and characterization of the haloacid-degrading Burkholderia caribensis MBA4.

Burkholderia caribensis MBA4 was isolated from soil for its capability to grow on haloacids. This bacterium has a genome size of 9,482,704 bp. Here we report the genome sequences and annotation, together with characteristics of the genome. The complete genome sequence consists of three replicons, comprising 9056 protein-coding genes and 80 RNA genes. Genes responsible for dehalogenation and uptake of haloacids were arranged as an operon. While dehalogenation of haloacetate would produce glycolate, three glycolate operons were identified. Two of these operons contain an upstream glcC regulator gene. It is likely that the expression of one of these operons is responsive to haloacetate. Genes responsible for the metabolism of dehalogenation product of halopropionate were also identified.


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