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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Characterization of four endophytic fungi as potential consolidated bioprocessing hosts for conversion of lignocellulose into advanced biofuels.

Recently, several endophytic fungi have been demonstrated to produce volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with properties similar to fossil fuels, called “mycodiesel,” while growing on lignocellulosic plant and agricultural residues. The fact that endophytes are plant symbionts suggests that some may be able to produce lignocellulolytic enzymes, making them capable of both deconstructing lignocellulose and converting it into mycodiesel, two properties that indicate that these strains may be useful consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) hosts for the biofuel production. In this study, four endophytes Hypoxylon sp. CI4A, Hypoxylon sp. EC38, Hypoxylon sp. CO27, and Daldinia eschscholzii EC12 were selected and evaluated for their…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Dam and Dcm methylations prevent gene transfer into Clostridium pasteurianum NRRL B-598: development of methods for electrotransformation, conjugation, and sonoporation.

Butanol is currently one of the most discussed biofuels. Its use provides many benefits in comparison to bio-ethanol, but the price of its fermentative production is still high. Genetic improvements could help solve many problems associated with butanol production during ABE fermentation, such as its toxicity, low concentration achievable in the cultivation medium, the need for a relatively expensive substrate, and many more. Clostridium pasteurianum NRRL B-598 is non-type strain producing butanol, acetone, and a negligible amount of ethanol. Its main benefits are high oxygen tolerance, utilization of a wide range of carbon and nitrogen sources, and the availability of…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Comparative genomics of early-diverging mushroom-forming fungi provides insights into the origins of lignocellulose decay capabilities.

Evolution of lignocellulose decomposition was one of the most ecologically important innovations in fungi. White-rot fungi in the Agaricomycetes (mushrooms and relatives) are the most effective microorganisms in degrading both cellulose and lignin components of woody plant cell walls (PCW). However, the precise evolutionary origins of lignocellulose decomposition are poorly understood, largely because certain early-diverging clades of Agaricomycetes and its sister group, the Dacrymycetes, have yet to be sampled, or have been undersampled, in comparative genomic studies. Here, we present new genome sequences of ten saprotrophic fungi, including members of the Dacrymycetes and early-diverging clades of Agaricomycetes (Cantharellales, Sebacinales, Auriculariales,…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequences of two interactive moderate thermophiles, Paenibacillus napthalenovorans 32O-Y and Paenibacillus sp. 32O-W.

Microorganisms with the capability to desulfurize petroleum are in high demand with escalating restrictions currently placed on fuel purity. Thermophilic desulfurizers are particularly valuable in high-temperature industrial applications. We report the whole-genome sequences of Paenibacillus napthalenovorans 32O-Y and Paenibacillus sp. 32O-W, which can and cannot, respectively, metabolize dibenzothiophene. Copyright © 2016 Butler et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Investigation of proposed ladderane biosynthetic genes from anammox bacteria by heterologous expression in E. coli.

Ladderanes are hydrocarbon chains with three or five linearly concatenated cyclobutane rings that are uniquely produced as membrane lipid components by anammox (anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing) bacteria. By virtue of their angle and torsional strain, ladderanes are unusually energetic compounds, and if produced biochemically by engineered microbes, could serve as renewable, high-energy-density jet fuel components. The biochemistry and genetics underlying the ladderane biosynthetic pathway are unknown, however, previous studies have identified a pool of 34 candidate genes from the anammox bacterium, Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, some or all of which may be involved with ladderane fatty acid biosynthesis. The goal of the present study…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of a psychotrophic Arthrobacter strain A3 (CGMCC 1.8987), a novel long-chain hydrocarbons producer.

Arthrobacter strain A3, a psychotrophic bacterium isolated from the Tian Shan Mountain of China, can degrade the cellulose and synthesis the long-chain hydrocarbons efficiently in low temperature. Here we report the complete genome sequence of this bacterium. The complete genome sequence of Arthrobacter strain A3, consisting of a cycle chromosome with a size of 4.26 Mbp and a cycle plasmid with a size of 194kbp. In this genome, a hydrocarbon biosynthesis gene cluster (oleA, oleB/oleC and oleD) was identified. To resistant the extreme environment, this strain contains a unique mycothiol-biosynthetic pathway (mshA-D), which has not been found in other Arthrobacter…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence and analysis of a stress-tolerant, wild-derived strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae used in biofuels research

The genome sequences of more than 100 strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been published. Unfortunately, most of these genome assemblies contain dozens to hundreds of gaps at repetitive sequences, including transposable elements, tRNAs, and subtelomeric regions, which is where novel genes generally reside. Relatively few strains have been chosen for genome sequencing based on their biofuel production potential, leaving an additional knowledge gap. Here, we describe the nearly complete genome sequence of GLBRCY22-3 (Y22-3), a strain of S. cerevisiae derived from the stress-tolerant wild strain NRRL YB-210 and subsequently engineered for xylose metabolism. After benchmarking several genome assembly…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Isolation and complete genome sequence of the thermophilic Geobacillus sp. 12AMOR1 from an Arctic deep-sea hydrothermal vent site.

Members of the genus Geobacillus have been isolated from a wide variety of habitats worldwide and are the subject for targeted enzyme utilization in various industrial applications. Here we report the isolation and complete genome sequence of the thermophilic starch-degrading Geobacillus sp. 12AMOR1. The strain 12AMOR1 was isolated from deep-sea hot sediment at the Jan Mayen hydrothermal Vent Site. Geobacillus sp. 12AMOR1 consists of a 3,410,035 bp circular chromosome and a 32,689 bp plasmid with a G?+?C content of 52 % and 47 %, respectively. The genome comprises 3323 protein-coding genes, 88 tRNA species and 10 rRNA operons. The isolate…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Near-Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium paradoxum Strain JW-YL-7.

Clostridium paradoxum strain JW-YL-7 is a moderately thermophilic anaerobic alkaliphile isolated from the municipal sewage treatment plant in Athens, GA. We report the near-complete genome sequence of C. paradoxum strain JW-YL-7 obtained by using PacBio DNA sequencing and Pilon for sequence assembly refinement with Illumina data. Copyright © 2016 Lancaster et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Co-utilization of glucose and xylose by evolved Thermus thermophilus LC113 strain elucidated by (13)C metabolic flux analysis and whole genome sequencing.

We evolved Thermus thermophilus to efficiently co-utilize glucose and xylose, the two most abundant sugars in lignocellulosic biomass, at high temperatures without carbon catabolite repression. To generate the strain, T. thermophilus HB8 was first evolved on glucose to improve its growth characteristics, followed by evolution on xylose. The resulting strain, T. thermophilus LC113, was characterized in growth studies, by whole genome sequencing, and (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) with [1,6-(13)C]glucose, [5-(13)C]xylose, and [1,6-(13)C]glucose+[5-(13)C]xylose as isotopic tracers. Compared to the starting strain, the evolved strain had an increased growth rate (~2-fold), increased biomass yield, increased tolerance to high temperatures up to 90°C,…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Draft genome sequence of Burkholderia sp. strain CCA53, isolated from leaf soil.

Burkholderia sp. strain CCA53 was isolated from leaf soil collected in Higashi-Hiroshima City in Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan. Here, we present a draft genome sequence of this strain, which consists of a total of 4 contigs containing 6,647,893 bp, with a G+C content of 67.0% and comprising 9,329 predicted coding sequences. Copyright © 2016 Akita et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome-directed analysis of prophage excision, host defence systems, and central fermentative metabolism in Clostridium pasteurianum.

Clostridium pasteurianum is emerging as a prospective host for the production of biofuels and chemicals, and has recently been shown to directly consume electric current. Despite this growing biotechnological appeal, the organism’s genetics and central metabolism remain poorly understood. Here we present a concurrent genome sequence for the C. pasteurianum type strain and provide extensive genomic analysis of the organism’s defence mechanisms and central fermentative metabolism. Next generation genome sequencing produced reads corresponding to spontaneous excision of a novel phage, designated f6013, which could be induced using mitomycin C and detected using PCR and transmission electron microscopy. Methylome analysis of…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The genome of Pleurotus eryngii provides insights into the mechanisms of wood decay.

Pleurotus eryngii (DC.) Quél. is widely used for bioconverting lignocellulosic byproducts into biofuel and value added products. Sequencing and annotating the genome of a monokaryon strain P. eryngii 183 allows us to gain a better understanding of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) and oxidoreductases for degradation of lignocellulose in white-rot fungi. The genomic data provides insights into genomic basis of degradation mechanisms of lignin and cellulose and may pave new avenues for lignocellulose bioconversion. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence and transcriptomic analysis of a novel marine strain Bacillus weihaiensis reveals the mechanism of brown algae degradation.

A novel marine strain representing efficient degradation ability toward brown algae was isolated, identified, and assigned to Bacillus weihaiensis Alg07. The alga-associated marine bacteria promote the nutrient cycle and perform important functions in the marine ecosystem. The de novo sequencing of the B. weihaiensis Alg07 genome was carried out. Results of gene annotation and carbohydrate-active enzyme analysis showed that the strain harbored enzymes that can completely degrade alginate and laminarin, which are the specific polysaccharides of brown algae. We also found genes for the utilization of mannitol, the major storage monosaccharide in the cell of brown algae. To understand the…

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