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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Deciphering mixotrophic Clostridium formicoaceticum metabolism and energy conservation: Genomic analysis and experimental studies.

Clostridium formicoaceticum, a Gram-negative mixotrophic homoacetogen, produces acetic acid as the sole metabolic product from various carbon sources, including fructose, glycerol, formate, and CO2. Its genome of 4.59-Mbp contains a highly conserved Wood-Ljungdahl pathway gene cluster with the same layout as that in other mixotrophic acetogens, including Clostridium aceticum, Clostridium carboxidivorans, and Clostridium ljungdahlii. For energy conservation, C. formicoaceticum does not have all the genes required for the synthesis of cytochrome or quinone used for generating proton gradient in H+-dependent acetogens such as Moorella thermoacetica; instead, it has the Rnf system and a Na+-translocating ATPase similar to the one in…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Whole-genome sequencing of an NDM-1- and OXA-58-producing Acinetobacter towneri isolate from hospital sewage in Sichuan Province, China.

Acinetobacter spp. isolates carrying the blaNDM-1 gene are frequently reported. However, most reported blaNDM-1 genes are carried by clinical strains. Here we report a carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter towneri isolate from hospital sewage in China co-harbouring blaNDM-1 and blaOXA-58 in the genome.Whole-genome sequencing was performed using a single molecule, real-time (SMRT) sequencing platform with a Pacific Biosciences RS II Sequencer and MiSeq system. Reads were de novo assembled using Celera Assembler v.8.0. Genome annotation was performed using the NCBI Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline (PGAP), and the genome sequence was analysed by bioinformatics methods.The 2963729-bp genome with a G+C content of 41.30% displayed…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Methanogenic and bacterial endosymbionts of free-living anaerobic ciliates

Trimyema compressum thrives in anoxic freshwater environments in which it preys on bacteria and grows with fermentative metabolisms. Like many anaerobic protozoa, instead of mitochondria, T. compressum possess hydrogenosomes, which are hydrogen-producing, energy-generating organelles characteristic of anaerobic protozoa and fungi. The cytoplasm of T. compressum harbours hydrogenotrophic methanogens that consume the hydrogen produced by hydrogenosome, which confers an energetic advantage to the host ciliate. Symbiotic associations between methanogenic archaea and Trimyema ciliates are thought to be established independently and/or repeatedly in their evolutional history. In addition to methanogenic symbionts, T. compressum houses bacterial symbiont TC1 whose function is unknown in…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Streptacidiphilus sp. strain 15-057A, obtained from bronchial lavage fluid.

Streptacidiphilus sp. strain 15-057A was isolated from a bronchial lavage sample and represents the only member of the genus not isolated from acidic soils. A single circular chromosome of 7.01?Mb was obtained by combining Illumina and PacBio sequencing data. Bioinformatic analysis detected 63 putative secondary biosynthetic gene clusters and recognized 43 transposons.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Sulfitobacter sp. strain D7, a virulent bacterium isolated from an Emiliania huxleyi algal bloom in the North Atlantic.

A Rhodobacterales bacterium, Sulfitobacter sp. strain D7, was isolated from an Emiliania huxleyi bloom in the North Atlantic and has been shown to act as a pathogen and induce cell death of E. huxleyi during lab coculturing. We report here its complete genome sequence comprising one chromosome and five low-copy-number plasmids.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

BELLA: Berkeley Efficient Long-Read to Long-Read Aligner and Overlapper

De novo assembly is the process of reconstructing genomes from DNA fragments (reads), which may contain redundancy and errors. Longer reads simplify assembly and improve contiguity of the output, but current long-read technologies come with high error rates. A crucial step of de novo genome assembly for long reads consists of finding overlapping reads. We present Berkeley Long-Read to Long-Read Aligner and Overlapper (BELLA), which implement a novel approach to compute overlaps using Sparse Generalized Matrix Multiplication (SpGEMM). We present a probabilistic model which demonstrates the soundness of using short, fixed length k-mers to detect overlaps, avoiding expensive pairwise alignment…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genomics and biochemistry investigation on the metabolic pathway of milled wood and alkali lignin-derived aromatic metabolites of Comamonas serinivorans SP-35.

The efficient depolymerization and utilization of lignin are one of the most important goals for the renewable use of lignocelluloses. The degradation and complete mineralization of lignin by bacteria represent a key step for carbon recycling in land ecosystems as well. However, many aspects of this process remain unclear, for example, the complex network of metabolic pathways involved in the degradation of lignin and the catabolic pathway of intermediate aromatic metabolites. To address these subjects, we characterized the deconstruction and mineralization of lignin with milled wood lignin (MWL, the most representative molecule of lignin in its native state) and alkali…

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