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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome Sequence of Bacillus pumilus MTCC B6033.

Bacillus pumilus is a Gram-positive, rod-shaped, aerobic bacterium isolated from the soil. B. pumilus strain B6033 was originally selected as a biocatalyst for the stereospecific oxidation of ß-lactams. Here, we present a 3.8-Mb assembly of its genome, which is the second fully assembled genome of a B. pumilus strain.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Novel giant siphovirus from Bacillus anthracis features unusual genome characteristics.

Here we present vB_BanS-Tsamsa, a novel temperate phage isolated from Bacillus anthracis, the agent responsible for anthrax infections in wildlife, livestock and humans. Tsamsa phage is a giant siphovirus (order Caudovirales), featuring a long, flexible and non-contractile tail of 440 nm (not including baseplate structure) and an isometric head of 82 nm in diameter. We induced Tsamsa phage in samples from two different carcass sites in Etosha National Park, Namibia. The Tsamsa phage genome is the largest sequenced Bacillus siphovirus, containing 168,876 bp and 272 ORFs. The genome features an integrase/recombinase enzyme, indicative of a temperate lifestyle. Among bacterial strains…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The odd one out: Bacillus ACT bacteriophage CP-51 exhibits unusual properties compared to related Spounavirinae W.Ph. and Bastille.

The Bacillus ACT group includes three important pathogenic species of Bacillus: anthracis, cereus and thuringiensis. We characterized three virulent bacteriophages, Bastille, W.Ph. and CP-51, that infect various strains of these three species. We have determined the complete genome sequences of CP-51, W.Ph. and Bastille, and their physical genome structures. The CP-51 genome sequence could only be obtained using a combination of conventional and second and third next generation sequencing technologies – illustrating the problems associated with sequencing highly modified DNA. We present evidence that the generalized transduction facilitated by CP-51 is independent of a specific genome structure, but likely due…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Enhanced 5-methylcytosine detection in single-molecule, real-time sequencing via Tet1 oxidation.

DNA methylation serves as an important epigenetic mark in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. In eukaryotes, the most common epigenetic mark is 5-methylcytosine, whereas prokaryotes can have 6-methyladenine, 4-methylcytosine, or 5-methylcytosine. Single-molecule, real-time sequencing is capable of directly detecting all three types of modified bases. However, the kinetic signature of 5-methylcytosine is subtle, which presents a challenge for detection. We investigated whether conversion of 5-methylcytosine to 5-carboxylcytosine using the enzyme Tet1 would enhance the kinetic signature, thereby improving detection.We characterized the kinetic signatures of various cytosine modifications, demonstrating that 5-carboxylcytosine has a larger impact on the local polymerase rate than…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis strain PY79.

Bacillus subtilis is a Gram-positive soil-dwelling and endospore-forming bacterium in the phylum Firmicutes. B. subtilis strain PY79 is a prototrophic laboratory strain that has been highly used for studying a wide variety of cellular pathways. Here, we announce the complete whole-genome sequence of B. subtilis PY79.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Comparative genomics of extrachromosomal elements in Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis.

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis is one of the most important microorganisms used against mosquitoes. It was intensively studied following its discovery and became a model bacterium of the B. thuringiensis species. Those studies focused on toxin genes, aggregation-associated conjugation, linear genome phages, etc. Recent announcements of genomic sequences of different strains have not been explicitly related to the biological properties studied. We report data on plasmid content analysis of four strains using ultra-high-throughput sequencing. The strains were commercial product isolates, with their putative ancestor and type B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strain sequenced earlier. The assembled contigs corresponding to published and…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis J-5, a potential biocontrol agent.

Bacillus subtilis J-5 was isolated from tomato rhizosphere soil and exhibited strong inhibitory activity against Botrytis cinerea To shed light on the molecular mechanism underlying the biological control on phytopathogens, the whole genome of this strain was sequenced. Genes encoding antimicrobial compounds and the regulatory systems were identified in the genome. Copyright © 2017 Jia et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Non-toxin-producing Bacillus cereus strains belonging to the B. anthracis clade isolated from the International Space Station.

In an ongoing Microbial Observatory investigation of the International Space Station (ISS), 11 Bacillus strains (2 from the Kibo Japanese experimental module, 4 from the U.S. segment, and 5 from the Russian module) were isolated and their whole genomes were sequenced. A comparative analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of these isolates showed the highest similarity (>99%) to the Bacillus anthracis-B. cereus-B. thuringiensis group. The fatty acid composition, polar lipid profile, peptidoglycan type, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight profiles were consistent with the B. cereus sensu lato group. The phenotypic traits such as motile rods, enterotoxin production, lack of capsule,…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Comparative genomic analysis reveals genetic features related to the virulence of Bacillus cereus FORC_013.

Bacillus cereus is well known as a gastrointestinal pathogen that causes food-borne illness. In the present study, we sequenced the complete genome of B. cereus FORC_013 isolated from fried eel in South Korea. To extend our understanding of the genomic characteristics of FORC_013, we conducted a comparative analysis with the published genomes of other B. cereus strains.We fully assembled the single circular chromosome (5,418,913 bp) and one plasmid (259,749 bp); 5511 open reading frames (ORFs) and 283 ORFs were predicted for the chromosome and plasmid, respectively. Moreover, we detected that the enterotoxin (NHE, HBL, CytK) induces food-borne illness with diarrheal symptom, and…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence and bioinformatics analyses of Bacillus thuringiensis strain BM-BT15426.

This study aimed to investigate the genetic characteristics of Bacillus thuringiensis strain BM-BT15426.B. thuringiensis strain was identified by sequencing the PCR product (amplifying 16S rRNA gene) using ABI Prism 377 DNA Sequencer. The genome was sequenced using PacBio RS II sequencers and assembled de novo using HGAP. Also, further genome annotation was performed.The genome of B. thuringiensis strain BM-BT15426 has a length of 5,246,329 bp and contains 5409 predicted genes with an average G + C content of 35.40%. Three genes were involved in the “Infectious diseases: Amoebiasis” pathway. A total of 21 virulence factors and 9 antibiotic resistant genes were identified.The major pathogenic…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Bacillus velezensis LM2303, a biocontrol strain isolated from the dung of wild yak inhabited Qinghai-Tibet plateau.

Bacillus velezensis LM2303 is a biocontrol strain with a broad inhibitory spectrum against plant pathogens, isolated from the dung of wild yak inhabited Qinghai-Tibet plateau, China. Here we present its complete genome sequence, which consists of a single, circular chromosome of 3,989,393bp with a 46.68% G+C content. Genome analysis revealed genes encoding specialized functions for the biosynthesis of antifungal metabolites and antibacterial metabolites, the promotion of plant growth, the alleviation of oxidative stress and nutrient utilization. And the biosynthesis of antimicrobial metabolites in strain LM2303 was confirmed by biochemical analysis, while its plant growth promoting traits were confirmed by inoculation…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

First complete genome sequence of Bacillus glycinifermentans B-27.

The first complete genome sequence of Bacillus glycinifermentans B-27 was determined by SMRT sequencing generating a genome sequence with a total length of 4,607,442 bases. Based on this sequence 4738 protein-coding sequences were predicted and used to identify gene clusters that are related to the production of secondary metabolites such as Lichenysin, Bacillibactin and Bacitracin. This genomic potential combined with the ability of B. glycinifermentans B-27 to grown in bile containing media might contribute to a future application of this strain as probiotic in productive livestock potentially inhibiting competing and pathogenic organisms. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier…

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