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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Dissecting a hidden gene duplication: the Arabidopsis thaliana SEC10 locus.

Repetitive sequences present a challenge for genome sequence assembly, and highly similar segmental duplications may disappear from assembled genome sequences. Having found a surprising lack of observable phenotypic deviations and non-Mendelian segregation in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants in SEC10, a gene encoding a core subunit of the exocyst tethering complex, we examined whether this could be explained by a hidden gene duplication. Re-sequencing and manual assembly of the Arabidopsis thaliana SEC10 (At5g12370) locus revealed that this locus, comprising a single gene in the reference genome assembly, indeed contains two paralogous genes in tandem, SEC10a and SEC10b, and that a sequence segment…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

NOVOPlasty: de novo assembly of organelle genomes from whole genome data.

The evolution in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has led to the development of many different assembly algorithms, but few of them focus on assembling the organelle genomes. These genomes are used in phylogenetic studies, food identification and are the most deposited eukaryotic genomes in GenBank. Producing organelle genome assembly from whole genome sequencing (WGS) data would be the most accurate and least laborious approach, but a tool specifically designed for this task is lacking. We developed a seed-and-extend algorithm that assembles organelle genomes from whole genome sequencing (WGS) data, starting from a related or distant single seed sequence. The algorithm…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Cytosine methylation at CpCpG sites triggers accumulation of non-CpG methylation in gene bodies.

Methylation of cytosine is an epigenetic mark involved in the regulation of transcription, usually associated with transcriptional repression. In mammals, methylated cytosines are found predominantly in CpGs but in plants non-CpG methylation (in the CpHpG or CpHpH contexts, where H is A, C or T) is also present and is associated with the transcriptional silencing of transposable elements. In addition, CpG methylation is found in coding regions of active genes. In the absence of the demethylase of lysine 9 of histone 3 (IBM1), a subset of body-methylated genes acquires non-CpG methylation. This was shown to alter their expression and affect…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Centromere location in Arabidopsis is unaltered by extreme divergence in CENH3 protein sequence.

During cell division, spindle fibers attach to chromosomes at centromeres. The DNA sequence at regional centromeres is fast evolving with no conserved genetic signature for centromere identity. Instead CENH3, a centromere-specific histone H3 variant, is the epigenetic signature that specifies centromere location across both plant and animal kingdoms. Paradoxically, CENH3 is also adaptively evolving. An ongoing question is whether CENH3 evolution is driven by a functional relationship with the underlying DNA sequence. Here, we demonstrate that despite extensive protein sequence divergence, CENH3 histones from distant species assemble centromeres on the same underlying DNA sequence. We first characterized the organization and…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequencing reveals the origin of the allotetraploid Arabidopsis suecica.

Polyploidy is an example of instantaneous speciation when it involves the formation of a new cytotype that is incompatible with the parental species. Because new polyploid individuals are likely to be rare, establishment of a new species is unlikely unless polyploids are able to reproduce through self-fertilization (selfing), or asexually. Conversely, selfing (or asexuality) makes it possible for polyploid species to originate from a single individual-a bona fide speciation event. The extent to which this happens is not known. Here, we consider the origin of Arabidopsis suecica, a selfing allopolyploid between Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis arenosa, which has hitherto been…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

HISEA: HIerarchical SEed Aligner for PacBio data.

The next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques have been around for over a decade. Many of their fundamental applications rely on the ability to compute good genome assemblies. As the technology evolves, the assembly algorithms and tools have to continuously adjust and improve. The currently dominant technology of Illumina produces reads that are too short to bridge many repeats, setting limits on what can be successfully assembled. The emerging SMRT (Single Molecule, Real-Time) sequencing technique from Pacific Biosciences produces uniform coverage and long reads of length up to sixty thousand base pairs, enabling significantly better genome assemblies. However, SMRT reads are…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

rHAT: fast alignment of noisy long reads with regional hashing.

Single Molecule Real-Time (SMRT) sequencing has been widely applied in cutting-edge genomic studies. However, it is still an expensive task to align the noisy long SMRT reads to reference genome by state-of-the-art aligners, which is becoming a bot-tleneck in applications with SMRT sequencing. Novel approach is on demand for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of SMRT read alignment.We propose Regional Hashing-based Alignment Tool (rHAT), a seed-and-extension-based read alignment approach specifically designed for noisy long reads. rHAT indexes reference genome by regional hash table (RHT), a hash table-based index which describes the short tokens within local windows of reference genome. In…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Exploring structural variants in environmentally sensitive gene families.

Environmentally sensitive plant gene families like NBS-LRRs, receptor kinases, defensins and others, are known to be highly variable. However, most existing strategies for discovering and describing structural variation in complex gene families provide incomplete and imperfect results. The move to de novo genome assemblies for multiple accessions or individuals within a species is enabling more comprehensive and accurate insights about gene family variation. Earlier array-based genome hybridization and sequence-based read mapping methods were limited by their reliance on a reference genome and by misplacement of paralogous sequences. Variant discovery based on de novo genome assemblies overcome the problems arising from…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Population scale mapping of transposable element diversity reveals links to gene regulation and epigenomic variation.

Variation in the presence or absence of transposable elements (TEs) is a major source of genetic variation between individuals. Here, we identified 23,095 TE presence/absence variants between 216 Arabidopsis accessions. Most TE variants were rare, and we find these rare variants associated with local extremes of gene expression and DNA methylation levels within the population. Of the common alleles identified, two thirds were not in linkage disequilibrium with nearby SNPs, implicating these variants as a source of novel genetic diversity. Many common TE variants were associated with significantly altered expression of nearby genes, and a major fraction of inter-accession DNA…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

1,135 genomes reveal the global pattern of polymorphism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

Arabidopsis thaliana serves as a model organism for the study of fundamental physiological, cellular, and molecular processes. It has also greatly advanced our understanding of intraspecific genome variation. We present a detailed map of variation in 1,135 high-quality re-sequenced natural inbred lines representing the native Eurasian and North African range and recently colonized North America. We identify relict populations that continue to inhabit ancestral habitats, primarily in the Iberian Peninsula. They have mixed with a lineage that has spread to northern latitudes from an unknown glacial refugium and is now found in a much broader spectrum of habitats. Insights into…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Sparc: a sparsity-based consensus algorithm for long erroneous sequencing reads.

Motivation. The third generation sequencing (3GS) technology generates long sequences of thousands of bases. However, its current error rates are estimated in the range of 15-40%, significantly higher than those of the prevalent next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies (less than 1%). Fundamental bioinformatics tasks such as de novo genome assembly and variant calling require high-quality sequences that need to be extracted from these long but erroneous 3GS sequences. Results. We describe a versatile and efficient linear complexity consensus algorithm Sparc to facilitate de novo genome assembly. Sparc builds a sparse k-mer graph using a collection of sequences from a targeted…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Recombination rate heterogeneity within Arabidopsis disease resistance genes.

Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr) effectors by resistance (R) genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Variation of 45S rDNA intergenic spacers in Arabidopsis thaliana.

Approximately seven hundred 45S rRNA genes (rDNA) in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome are organised in two 4 Mbp-long arrays of tandem repeats arranged in head-to-tail fashion separated by an intergenic spacer (IGS). These arrays make up 5?% of the A. thaliana genome. IGS are rapidly evolving sequences and frequent rearrangements inside the rDNA loci have generated considerable interspecific and even intra-individual variability which allows to distinguish among otherwise highly conserved rRNA genes. The IGS has not been comprehensively described despite its potential importance in regulation of rDNA transcription and replication. Here we describe the detailed sequence variation in the complete…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Assemblytics: a web analytics tool for the detection of variants from an assembly.

Assemblytics is a web app for detecting and analyzing variants from a de novo genome assembly aligned to a reference genome. It incorporates a unique anchor filtering approach to increase robustness to repetitive elements, and identifies six classes of variants based on their distinct alignment signatures. Assemblytics can be applied both to comparing aberrant genomes, such as human cancers, to a reference, or to identify differences between related species. Multiple interactive visualizations enable in-depth explorations of the genomic distributions of variants.http://assemblytics.com, https://github.com/marianattestad/assemblytics CONTACT: mnattest@cshl.eduSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Chloroplast genome sequence of Arabidopsis thaliana accession Landsberg erecta, assembled from single-molecule, real-time sequencing data.

A publicly available data set from Pacific Biosciences was used to create an assembly of the chloroplast genome sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana genotype Landsberg erecta The assembly is solely based on single-molecule, real-time sequencing data and hence provides high resolution of the two inverted repeat regions typically contained in chloroplast genomes. Copyright © 2016 Stadermann et al.

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