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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Scallop genome reveals molecular adaptations to semi-sessile life and neurotoxins.

Bivalve molluscs are descendants of an early-Cambrian lineage superbly adapted to benthic filter feeding. Adaptations in form and behavior are well recognized, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we investigate the genome, various transcriptomes, and proteomes of the scallop Chlamys farreri, a semi-sessile bivalve with well-developed adductor muscle, sophisticated eyes, and remarkable neurotoxin resistance. The scallop’s large striated muscle is energy-dynamic but not fully differentiated from smooth muscle. Its eyes are supported by highly diverse, intronless opsins expanded by retroposition for broadened spectral sensitivity. Rapid byssal secretion is enabled by a specialized foot and multiple proteins including…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence and comparative genomics of the golden pompano (Trachinotus ovatus) pathogen, Vibrio harveyistrain QT520.

Vibrio harveyi is a Gram-negative, halophilic bacterium that is an opportunistic pathogen of commercially farmed marine vertebrate species. To understand the pathogenicity of this species, the genome of V. harveyi QT520 was analyzed and compared to that of other strains. The results showed the genome of QT520 has two unique circular chromosomes and three endogenous plasmids, totaling 6,070,846 bp with a 45% GC content, 5,701 predicted ORFs, 134 tRNAs and 37 rRNAs. Common virulence factors, including ACF, IlpA, OmpU, Flagellin, Cya, Hemolysin and MARTX, were detected in the genome, which are likely responsible for the virulence of QT520. The results…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the highly virulent Aeromonas schubertii strain WL1483, isolated from diseased snakehead fish (Channa argus) in China.

We sequenced the complete genome of the highly virulent Aeromonas schubertii strain WL1483, which was isolated from diseased snakehead fish (Channa argus) in China. The full genome sequence of A. schubertii WL1483 is 4,400,034 bp, which encodes 4,376 proteins and contains 195 predicted RNA genes. Copyright © 2016 Liu et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

First complete genome sequence of Tenacibaculum dicentrarchi, an emerging bacterial pathogen of salmonids.

Tenacibaculum-like bacilli have recently been isolated from diseased sea-reared Atlantic salmon in outbreaks that took place in the XI region (Región de Aysén) of Chile. Molecular typing identified the bacterium as Tenacibaculum dicentrarchi. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the AY7486TD isolate recovered during those outbreaks. Copyright © 2016 Grothusen et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The Atlantic salmon genome provides insights into rediploidization.

The whole-genome duplication 80 million years ago of the common ancestor of salmonids (salmonid-specific fourth vertebrate whole-genome duplication, Ss4R) provides unique opportunities to learn about the evolutionary fate of a duplicated vertebrate genome in 70 extant lineages. Here we present a high-quality genome assembly for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), and show that large genomic reorganizations, coinciding with bursts of transposon-mediated repeat expansions, were crucial for the post-Ss4R rediploidization process. Comparisons of duplicate gene expression patterns across a wide range of tissues with orthologous genes from a pre-Ss4R outgroup unexpectedly demonstrate far more instances of neofunctionalization than subfunctionalization. Surprisingly, we find…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The channel catfish genome sequence provides insights into the evolution of scale formation in teleosts.

Catfish represent 12% of teleost or 6.3% of all vertebrate species, and are of enormous economic value. Here we report a high-quality reference genome sequence of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), the major aquaculture species in the US. The reference genome sequence was validated by genetic mapping of 54,000 SNPs, and annotated with 26,661 predicted protein-coding genes. Through comparative analysis of genomes and transcriptomes of scaled and scaleless fish and scale regeneration experiments, we address the genomic basis for the most striking physical characteristic of catfish, the evolutionary loss of scales and provide evidence that lack of secretory calcium-binding phosphoproteins accounts…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Vibrio alginolyticus ATCC 33787(T) isolated from seawater with three native megaplasmids.

Vibrio alginolyticus, an opportunistic pathogen, is commonly associated with vibriosis in fish and shellfish and can also cause superficial and ear infections in humans. V. alginolyticus ATCC 33787(T) was originally isolated from seawater and has been used as one of the type strains for exploring the virulence factors of marine bacteria and for developing vaccine against vibriosis. Here we sequenced and assembled the whole genome of this strain, and identified three megaplasmids and three Type VI secretion systems, thus providing useful information for the study of virulence factors and for the development of vaccine for Vibrio. Copyright © 2016. Published…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Vibrio anguillarum is genetically and phenotypically unaffected by long-term continuous exposure to the antibacterial compound tropodithietic acid.

Minimizing the use of antibiotics in the food production chain is essential for limiting the development and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. One alternative intervention strategy is the use of probiotic bacteria, and bacteria of the marine Roseobacter clade are capable of antagonizing fish-pathogenic vibrios in fish larvae and live feed cultures for fish larvae. The antibacterial compound tropodithietic acid (TDA), an antiporter that disrupts the proton motive force, is key in the antibacterial activity of several roseobacters. Introducing probiotics on a larger scale requires understanding of any potential side effects of long-term exposure of the pathogen to the probionts or…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

BAC-pool sequencing and analysis confirms growth-associated QTLs in the Asian seabass genome.

The Asian seabass is an important marine food fish that has been cultured for several decades in Asia Pacific. However, the lack of a high quality reference genome has hampered efforts to improve its selective breeding. A 3D BAC pool set generated in this study was screened using 22 SSR markers located on linkage group 2 which contains a growth-related QTL region. Seventy-two clones corresponding to 22 FPC contigs were sequenced by Illumina MiSeq technology. We co-assembled the MiSeq-derived scaffolds from each FPC contig with error-corrected PacBio reads, resulting in 187 sequences covering 9.7?Mb. Eleven genes annotated within this region…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genetic characterization of a blaVEB-2-carrying plasmid in Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

This study reports the first detection of blaVEB-2 gene in Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain isolated from a shrimp sample. The blaVEB-2 was carried on a novel Inc type plasmid, was likely to originate from aquatic organisms upon comparison with other known genetic elements in the GenBank. However, the plasmid contains resistance elements usually harbored by members of Enterobacteriaceae, suggesting that gene transfer events occurred and contributed to the formation of this multidrug resistance-encoding plasmid. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

A full-body transcriptome and proteome resource for the European common carp.

The common carp (Cyprinus carpio) is the oldest, most domesticated and one of the most cultured fish species for food consumption. Besides its economic importance, the common carp is also highly suitable for comparative physiological and disease studies in combination with the animal model zebrafish (Danio rerio). They are genetically closely related but offer complementary benefits for fundamental research, with the large body mass of common carp presenting possibilities for obtaining sufficient cell material for advanced transcriptome and proteome studies.Here we have used 19 different tissues from an F1 hybrid strain of the common carp to perform transcriptome analyses using…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Whole genome analysis of Yersinia ruckeri isolated over 27 years in Australia and New Zealand reveals geographical endemism over multiple lineages and recent evolution under host selection.

Yersinia ruckeri is a salmonid pathogen with widespread distribution in cool-temperate waters including Australia and New Zealand, two isolated environments with recently developed salmonid farming industries. Phylogenetic comparison of 58 isolates from Australia, New Zealand, USA, Chile, Finland and China based on non-recombinant core genome SNPs revealed multiple deep-branching lineages, with a most recent common ancestor estimated at 18?500 years BP (12?355-24?757 95% HPD) and evidence of Australasian endemism. Evolution within the Tasmanian Atlantic salmon serotype O1b lineage has been slow, with 63 SNPs describing the variance over 27 years. Isolates from the prevailing lineage are poorly/non-motile compared to a…

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