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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Potential mechanisms of attenuation for rifampicin-passaged strains of Flavobacterium psychrophilum.

Flavobacterium psychrophilum is the etiologic agent of bacterial coldwater disease in salmonids. Earlier research showed that a rifampicin-passaged strain of F. psychrophilum (CSF 259-93B.17) caused no disease in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum) while inducing a protective immune response against challenge with the virulent CSF 259-93 strain. We hypothesized that rifampicin passage leads to an accumulation of genomic mutations that, by chance, reduce virulence. To assess the pattern of phenotypic and genotypic changes associated with passage, we examined proteomic, LPS and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) differences for two F. psychrophilum strains (CSF 259-93 and THC 02-90) that were passaged with and…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of an Edwardsiella piscicida-like species, recovered from tilapia in the United States.

An Edwardsiella piscicida-like species is a Gram-negative facultative anaerobe that causes disease in some fish species. In this report, we present the complete and annotated genome of isolate LADL05-105, recovered from cultured tilapia reared in Louisiana, which contains a chromosome of 4,142,037 bp and no plasmids. Copyright © 2015 Reichley et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence for the shellfish pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus RE98 isolated from a shellfish hatchery.

Vibrio coralliilyticus is a pathogen of corals and larval shellfish. Publications on strain RE98 list it as a Vibrio tubiashii; however, whole genome sequencing confirms RE98 as V. coralliilyticus containing a total of 6,037,824 bp consisting of two chromosomes (3,420,228 and 1,917,482 bp) and two megaplasmids (380,714 and 319,400 bp). Copyright © 2014 Richards et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete mitogenome of Indian mottled eel, Anguilla bengalensis bengalensis (Gray, 1831) through PacBio RSII sequencing.

Complete mitogenome sequence for Anguilla bengalensis bengalensis (family Anguillidae) was generated through third-generation sequencing platform. The 16?714 bp mitgenome sequence contained 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs, 2 ribosomal RNAs, and a non-coding (control) region. The gene order was identical to that observed in most of the other vertebrates. The comparison of complete mitogenome sequence of Indian mottled eel generated during this study with two other subspecies did not agree with the taxonomic status of the three subspecies and considered as one species.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Current status of genome sequencing and its applications in aquaculture

Aquaculture is the fastest-growing food production sector in agriculture, with great potential to meet projected protein needs of human beings. Aquaculture is facing several challenges, including lack of a sufficient number of genetically improved species, lack of species-specific feeds, high mortality due to diseases and pollution of ecosystems. The rapid development of sequencing technologies has revolutionized biological sciences, and supplied necessary tools to tackle these challenges in aquaculture and thus ensure its sustainability and profitability. So far, draft genomes have been published in over 24 aquaculture species, and used to address important issues related to aquaculture. We briefly review the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Modified low-salt CTAB extraction of high-quality DNA from contaminant-rich tissues.

The increasing use of high-throughput sequencing platforms has made the isolation of pure, high molecular weight DNA a primary concern for studies of a diverse range of organisms. Purification of DNA remains a significant challenge in many tissue and sample types due to various organic and inorganic molecules that coprecipitate with nucleic acids. Molluscs, for example, contain high concentrations of polysaccharides which often coprecipitate with DNA and can inhibit downstream enzymatic reactions. We modified a low-salt CTAB (MoLSC) extraction protocol to accommodate contaminant-rich animal tissues and compared this method to a standard CTAB extraction protocol and two commercially available animal…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Evolutionary genomics of the cold-adapted diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus.

The Southern Ocean houses a diverse and productive community of organisms. Unicellular eukaryotic diatoms are the main primary producers in this environment, where photosynthesis is limited by low concentrations of dissolved iron and large seasonal fluctuations in light, temperature and the extent of sea ice. How diatoms have adapted to this extreme environment is largely unknown. Here we present insights into the genome evolution of a cold-adapted diatom from the Southern Ocean, Fragilariopsis cylindrus, based on a comparison with temperate diatoms. We find that approximately 24.7 per cent of the diploid F. cylindrus genome consists of genetic loci with alleles…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The genome sequence of an oxytetracycline-resistant isolate of the fish pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis harbors a multidrug resistance plasmid.

The amount of antibiotics needed to counteract frequent piscirickettsiosis outbreaks is a major concern for the Chilean salmon industry. Resistance to antibiotics may contribute to this issue. To understand the genetics underlying Piscirickettsia salmonis-resistant phenotypes, the genome of AY3800B, an oxytetracycline-resistant isolate bearing a multidrug resistance plasmid, is presented here. Copyright © 2017 Bohle et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Edwardsiella hoshinae ATCC 35051.

Edwardsiella hoshinae is a Gram-negative facultative anaerobe that has primarily been isolated from avians and reptiles. We report here the complete and annotated genome sequence of an isolate from a monitor lizard (Varanus sp.), which contains a chromosome of 3,811,650 bp and no plasmids. Copyright © 2017 Reichley et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Analysis of the complete genome sequence of Nocardia seriolae UTF1, the causative agent of fish nocardiosis: The first reference genome sequence of the fish pathogenic Nocardia species.

Nocardiosis caused by Nocardia seriolae is one of the major threats in the aquaculture of Seriola species (yellowtail; S. quinqueradiata, amberjack; S. dumerili and kingfish; S. lalandi) in Japan. Here, we report the complete nucleotide genome sequence of N. seriolae UTF1, isolated from a cultured yellowtail. The genome is a circular chromosome of 8,121,733 bp with a G+C content of 68.1% that encodes 7,697 predicted proteins. In the N. seriolae UTF1 predicted genes, we found orthologs of virulence factors of pathogenic mycobacteria and human clinical Nocardia isolates involved in host cell invasion, modulation of phagocyte function and survival inside the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

An improved genome assembly uncovers prolific tandem repeats in Atlantic cod.

The first Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) genome assembly published in 2011 was one of the early genome assemblies exclusively based on high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing. Since then, rapid advances in sequencing technologies have led to a multitude of assemblies generated for complex genomes, although many of these are of a fragmented nature with a significant fraction of bases in gaps. The development of long-read sequencing and improved software now enable the generation of more contiguous genome assemblies.By combining data from Illumina, 454 and the longer PacBio sequencing technologies, as well as integrating the results of multiple assembly programs, we have created…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Streptococcus iniae 89353, a virulent strain isolated from diseased tilapia in Taiwan.

Streptococcus iniae 89353 is a virulent strain isolated from diseased tilapia in Taiwan. The full-genome sequence of S. iniae 89353 is 2,098,647 bp. The revealed genome information will be beneficial for identification and understanding of potential virulence genes of Streptococcus iniae and possible immunogens for vaccine development against streptococcosis. Copyright © 2017 Gong et al.

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