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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Evolution and comparative genomics of F33:A-:B- plasmids carrying blaCTX-M-55 or blaCTX-M-65 in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from animals.

To understand the underlying evolution process of F33:A-:B- plasmids among Enterobacteriaceae isolates of various origins in China, the complete sequences of 17 blaCTX-M-harboring F33:A-:B- plasmids obtained from Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from different sources (animals, animal-derived food, and human clinics) in China were determined. F33:A-:B- plasmids shared similar plasmid backbones comprising replication, leading, and conjugative transfer regions and differed by the numbers of repeats in yddA and traD and by the presence of group II intron, except that pHNAH9 lacked a large segment of the leading and transfer regions. The variable regions of F33:A-B- plasmids were distinct and…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of an avian native NDM-1-producing Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Corvallis strain.

Carbapenems are an important class of ß-lactams and one of the last options for treating severe human infections. We present here the complete genome sequence of avian native carbapenemase-producing Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Corvallis strain 12-01738, harboring a blaNDM-1-carrying IncA/C2 plasmid, isolated in 2012 from a wild bird (Milvus migrans) in Germany. Copyright © 2018 Hadziabdic et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete and assembled genome sequence of an NDM-5- and CTX-M-15-producing Escherichia coli sequence type 617 isolated from wastewater in Switzerland.

Carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli have emerged worldwide and represent a major challenge to effective healthcare management. Here we report the genome sequence of an NDM-5- and CTX-M-15-producing E. coli belonging to sequence type 617 isolated from wastewater treatment plant effluent in Switzerland.Whole-genome sequencing of E. coli 657SK2 was performed using Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology RS2 reads (C4/P6 chemistry). De novo assembly was carried out using Canu 1.6, and sequences were annotated using the NCBI Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline (PGAP).The genome of E. coli 657SK2 consists of a 4.9-Mbp chromosome containing blaCTX-M-15, genes associated with virulence [fyuA, hlyE, the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Evolutionary emergence of drug resistance in Candida opportunistic pathogens.

Fungal infections, such as candidiasis caused by Candida, pose a problem of growing medical concern. In developed countries, the incidence of Candida infections is increasing due to the higher survival of susceptible populations, such as immunocompromised patients or the elderly. Existing treatment options are limited to few antifungal drug families with efficacies that vary depending on the infecting species. In this context, the emergence and spread of resistant Candida isolates are being increasingly reported. Understanding how resistance can evolve within naturally susceptible species is key to developing novel, more effective treatment strategies. However, in contrast to the situation of antibiotic…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequences of historic Clostridioides difficile food-dwelling ribotype 078 strains in Canada identical to that of the historic human clinical strain M120 in the United Kingdom.

Clostridioides (Clostridium) difficile is a spore-forming anaerobic bacte- rium that causes severe intestinal diseases in humans. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the first C. difficile foodborne type strain (PCR ribotype 078) isolated from food animals in Canada in 2004, which has 100% similarity to the ge- nome sequence of the historic human clinical strain M120.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

New variant of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium associated with invasive disease in immunocompromised patients in Vietnam.

Nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS), particularly Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, is among the leading etiologic agents of bacterial enterocolitis globally and a well-characterized cause of invasive disease (iNTS) in sub-Saharan Africa. In contrast, S Typhimurium is poorly defined in Southeast Asia, a known hot spot for zoonotic disease with a recently described burden of iNTS disease. Here, we aimed to add insight into the epidemiology and potential impact of zoonotic transfer and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in S Typhimurium associated with iNTS and enterocolitis in Vietnam. We performed whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic reconstruction on 85 human (enterocolitis, carriage, and iNTS) and 113 animal S Typhimurium isolates…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Chromosomal Sil system contributes to silver resistance in E. coli ATCC 8739.

The rise of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is endangering the efficacy of antibiotics, which consequently results in greater use of silver as a biocide. Chromosomal mapping of the Cus system or plasmid encoded Sil system and their relationship with silver resistance was studied for several gram-negative bacteria. However, only few reports investigated silver detoxification mediated by the Sil system integrated in Escherichia coli chromosome. Accordingly, this work aimed to study the Sil system in E. coli ATCC 8739 and to produce evidence for its role in silver resistance development. Silver resistance was induced in E. coli ATCC 8739 by…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of WM99c, an antibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii global clone 2 (GC2) strain representing an Australian GC2 lineage.

The extensively antibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolate WM99c recovered in Sydney, Australia, in 1999 is an early representative of a distinct lineage of global clone 2 (GC2) seen on the east coast of Australia. We present the complete 4.121-Mbp genome sequence (chromosome plus 2 plasmids), generated via long-read sequencing (PacBio).

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Whole-genome sequencing of an NDM-1- and OXA-58-producing Acinetobacter towneri isolate from hospital sewage in Sichuan Province, China.

Acinetobacter spp. isolates carrying the blaNDM-1 gene are frequently reported. However, most reported blaNDM-1 genes are carried by clinical strains. Here we report a carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter towneri isolate from hospital sewage in China co-harbouring blaNDM-1 and blaOXA-58 in the genome.Whole-genome sequencing was performed using a single molecule, real-time (SMRT) sequencing platform with a Pacific Biosciences RS II Sequencer and MiSeq system. Reads were de novo assembled using Celera Assembler v.8.0. Genome annotation was performed using the NCBI Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline (PGAP), and the genome sequence was analysed by bioinformatics methods.The 2963729-bp genome with a G+C content of 41.30% displayed…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Emergence of tigecycline resistance in Escherichia coli co-producing MCR-1 and NDM-5 during tigecycline salvage treatment.

Here, we report a case of severe infection caused by Escherichia coli that harbored mcr-1, blaNDM-5, and acquired resistance to tigecycline during tigecycline salvage therapy.Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, Southern blot hybridization, and complete genome sequence of the strains were carried out. The genetic characteristics of the mcr-1 and blaNDM-5 plasmids were analyzed. The whole genome sequencing of mcr-1-containing plasmid was completed. Finally, putative single nucleotide polymorphisms and deletion mutations in the tigecycline-resistant strain were predicted.Three E. coli isolates were obtained from ascites, pleural effusion, and stool of a patient; they were resistant to almost all the tested antibiotics. The first two…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

The ß-lactamase gene profile and a plasmid-carrying multiple heavy metal resistance genes of Enterobacter cloacae.

In this work, by high-throughput sequencing, antibiotic resistance genes, including class A (blaCTX-M, blaZ, blaTEM, blaVEB, blaKLUC, and blaSFO), class C (blaSHV, blaDHA, blaMIR, blaAZECL-29, and blaACT), and class D (blaOXA) ß-lactamase genes, were identified among the pooled genomic DNA from 212 clinical Enterobacter cloacae isolates. Six blaMIR-positive E. cloacae strains were identified, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) showed that these strains were not clonally related. The complete genome of the blaMIR-positive strain (Y546) consisted of both a chromosome (4.78?Mb) and a large plasmid pY546 (208.74?kb). The extended-spectrum ß-lactamases (ESBLs) (blaSHV-12 and blaCTX-M-9a) and AmpC (blaMIR) were encoded on the…

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