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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of the chromate-resistant bacterium Leucobacter salsicius type strain M1-8(T.).

Leucobacter salsicius M1-8(T) is a member of the Microbacteriaceae family within the class Actinomycetales. This strain is a Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacterium and was previously isolated from a Korean fermented food. Most members of the genus Leucobacter are chromate-resistant and this feature could be exploited in biotechnological applications. However, the genus Leucobacter is poorly characterized at the genome level, despite its potential importance. Thus, the present study determined the features of Leucobacter salsicius M1-8(T), as well as its genome sequence and annotation. The genome comprised 3,185,418 bp with a G+C content of 64.5%, which included 2,865 protein-coding genes and 68 RNA…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of “Candidatus Microthrix parvicella” Bio17-1, a long-chain-fatty-acid-accumulating filamentous actinobacterium from a biological wastewater treatment plant.

Candidatus Microthrix bacteria are deeply branching filamentous actinobacteria which occur at the water-air interface of biological wastewater treatment plants, where they are often responsible for foaming and bulking. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of a strain from this genus: “Candidatus Microthrix parvicella” strain Bio17-1.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genomic data mining of the marine actinobacteria Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 unveils insights into multi-stress related genes and metabolic pathways involved in antimicrobial synthesis.

Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 is an actinobacterial strain isolated from marine sediments of a Chilean Patagonian fjord. Morphological characterization together with antibacterial activity was assessed in various culture media, revealing a carbon-source dependent activity mainly against Gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus and L. monocytogenes). Genome mining of this antibacterial-producing bacterium revealed the presence of 26 biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) for secondary metabolites, where among them, 81% have low similarities with known BGCs. In addition, a genomic search in Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 unveiled the presence of a wide variety of genetic determinants related to heavy metal resistance (49 genes), oxidative stress (69 genes) and…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Genome sequence of Streptomyces sp. H-KF8, a marine actinobacterium isolated from a northern Chilean Patagonian fjord.

Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 is a fjord-derived marine actinobacterium capable of producing antimicrobial activity. Streptomyces sp. H-KF8 was isolated from sediments of the Comau fjord, located in the northern Chilean Patagonia. Here, we report the 7.7-Mb genome assembly, which represents the first genome of a Chilean marine actinobacterium. Copyright © 2017 Undabarrena et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Whole-genome sequences of two closely related bacteria, Actinomyces sp. strain Chiba101 and Actinomyces denticolens DSM 20671(T).

Actinomyces sp. strain Chiba101, isolated from an arthritic leg joint of a pig raised in Japan, is a bacterium closely related to Actinomyces denticolens Here, we deciphered the complete genome sequence of Actinomyces sp. Chiba101 and the high-quality draft genome sequence of A. denticolens DSM 20671(T). Copyright © 2017 Kanesaki et al.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome of Brachybacterium sp. P6-10-X1 isolated from deep-sea sediments of the Southern Ocean

Brachybacterium sp. P6-10-X1 is a rare actinobacterium isolated from deep-sea sediments in the Southern Ocean. To explore the potential of natural product biosynthesis, the genome was completely sequenced. It contained a circular chromosome of 4,385,603 bp with an average GC content of 70.9%. Genome mining revealed four biosynthetic gene clusters potentially producing new natural products.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Molecules to ecosystems: Actinomycete natural products in situ.

Actinomycetes, filamentous actinobacteria found in numerous ecosystems around the globe, produce a wide range of clinically useful natural products (NP). In natural environments, actinomycetes live in dynamic communities where environmental cues and ecological interactions likely influence NP biosynthesis. Our current understating of these cues, and the ecological roles of NP, is in its infancy. We postulate that understanding the ecological context in which actinomycete metabolites are made is fundamental to advancing the discovery of novel NP. In this review we explore the ecological relevance of actinomycetes and their secondary metabolites from varying ecosystems, and suggest that investigating the ecology of…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Rifamorpholines A-E, potential antibiotics from locust-associated actinobacteria Amycolatopsis sp. Hca4.

Cultivation of locust associated rare actinobacteria, Amycolatopsis sp. HCa4, has provided five unusual macrolactams rifamorpholines A-E. Their structures were determined by interpretation of spectroscopic and crystallographic data. Rifamorpholines A-E possess an unprecedented 5/6/6/6 ring chromophore, representing a new subclass of rifamycin antibiotics. The biosynthetic pathway for compounds 1-5 involves a key 1,6-cyclization for the formation of the morpholine ring. Compounds 2 and 4 showed potent activities against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with MICs of 4.0 and 8.0 µM, respectively.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of the sand-sediment actinobacterium Nocardioides dokdonensis FR1436(T).

Nocardioides dokdonensis, belonging to the class Actinobacteria, was first isolated from sand sediment of a beach in Dokdo, Korea, in 2005. In this study, we determined the genome sequence of FR1436, the type strain of N. dokdonensis, and analyzed its gene contents. The genome sequence is the second complete one in the genus Nocardioides after that of Nocardioides sp. JS614. It is composed of a 4,376,707-bp chromosome with a G + C content of 72.26%. From the genome sequence, 4,104 CDSs, three rRNA operons, 51 tRNAs, and one tmRNA were predicted, and 71.38% of the genes were assigned putative functions. Through the…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome of Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. limoneus KCTC 1717 (=KCCM 11405), a soil bacterium producing validamycin and diverse secondary metabolites.

Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. limoneus is a Gram-positive, aerobic, aerial mycelial, spore-forming bacterium that was first isolated from a soil sample in Akashi City, Hyogo Prefecture, Japan. We here report the complete genome of S. hygroscopicus subsp. limoneus KCTC 1717 (=KCCM 11405=IFO 12704=ATCC 21432), which consists of 10,537,932bp (G+C content of 71.96%) with two linear chromosomes, 8983 protein-coding genes, 67 tRNAs and 6 rRNA operons. Genes related to biosynthesis of validamycin, valienamine and diverse secondary metabolites were detected in this genome. Genomic data is thus expected to considerably improve our understanding of how industrially important aminocyclitols are biosynthesized by microbial cells.…

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

First complete genome sequence of a species in the genus Microterricola, an extremophilic cold active enzyme producing bacterial strain ERGS5:02 isolated from Sikkim Himalaya.

Here, we report the first ever complete genome sequence of any species in the genus Microterricola. The bacterium Microterricola viridarii ERGS5:02 isolated from the glacial stream of Sikkim Himalaya survived at low temperature and exhibited enhanced growth upon UV treatment, in addition, it also produced cold active enzymes. The complete genome assembly of 3.7 Mb suggested for the presence of genetic elements favoring the survival of bacterium under extreme conditions of UV and low temperature besides producing amylase, lipase and protease of industrial relevance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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Sunday, July 7, 2019

Complete genome sequence of Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 15439, producer of the methymycin/pikromycin family of macrolide antibiotics, using PacBio technology.

Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 15439, a producer of the methymycin/pikromycin family of macrolide antibiotics and a model host for natural product studies, obtained exclusively using PacBio sequencing technology. The 9.03-Mbp genome harbors 8,775 genes and 11 polyketide and nonribosomal peptide natural product gene clusters. Copyright © 2016 He et al.

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