fbpx
X

Quality Statement

Pacific Biosciences is committed to providing high-quality products that meet customer expectations and comply with regulations. We will achieve these goals by adhering to and maintaining an effective quality-management system designed to ensure product quality, performance, and safety.

X

Image Use Agreement

By downloading, copying, or making any use of the images located on this website (“Site”) you acknowledge that you have read and understand, and agree to, the terms of this Image Usage Agreement, as well as the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage, which together govern your use of the images as provided below. If you do not agree to such terms, do not download, copy or use the images in any way, unless you have written permission signed by an authorized Pacific Biosciences representative.

Subject to the terms of this Agreement and the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage (to the extent they do not conflict with the terms of this Agreement), you may use the images on the Site solely for (a) editorial use by press and/or industry analysts, (b) in connection with a normal, peer-reviewed, scientific publication, book or presentation, or the like. You may not alter or modify any image, in whole or in part, for any reason. You may not use any image in a manner that misrepresents the associated Pacific Biosciences product, service or technology or any associated characteristics, data, or properties thereof. You also may not use any image in a manner that denotes some representation or warranty (express, implied or statutory) from Pacific Biosciences of the product, service or technology. The rights granted by this Agreement are personal to you and are not transferable by you to another party.

You, and not Pacific Biosciences, are responsible for your use of the images. You acknowledge and agree that any misuse of the images or breach of this Agreement will cause Pacific Biosciences irreparable harm. Pacific Biosciences is either an owner or licensee of the image, and not an agent for the owner. You agree to give Pacific Biosciences a credit line as follows: "Courtesy of Pacific Biosciences of California, Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA" and also include any other credits or acknowledgments noted by Pacific Biosciences. You must include any copyright notice originally included with the images on all copies.

IMAGES ARE PROVIDED BY Pacific Biosciences ON AN "AS-IS" BASIS. Pacific Biosciences DISCLAIMS ALL REPRESENTATIONS AND WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, NON-INFRINGEMENT, OWNERSHIP, MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. IN NO EVENT SHALL Pacific Biosciences BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, PUNITIVE, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OF ANY KIND WHATSOEVER WITH RESPECT TO THE IMAGES.

You agree that Pacific Biosciences may terminate your access to and use of the images located on the PacificBiosciences.com website at any time and without prior notice, if it considers you to have violated any of the terms of this Image Use Agreement. You agree to indemnify, defend and hold harmless Pacific Biosciences, its officers, directors, employees, agents, licensors, suppliers and any third party information providers to the Site from and against all losses, expenses, damages and costs, including reasonable attorneys' fees, resulting from any violation by you of the terms of this Image Use Agreement or Pacific Biosciences' termination of your access to or use of the Site. Termination will not affect Pacific Biosciences' rights or your obligations which accrued before the termination.

I have read and understand, and agree to, the Image Usage Agreement.

I disagree and would like to return to the Pacific Biosciences home page.

Pacific Biosciences
Contact:
Tuesday, September 30, 2014

New Papers Detail Complexity of Methylome-Related Virulence in Human Pathogens

In two new publications, one published today, scientists from Australia, Italy, the UK, and the US report critical and surprising new findings about DNA methylation-related complexity of bacteria. Adding to the list of advances from genome-wide epigenetic analysis, these projects enhance our understanding of how methylation systems work in human pathogens — and offer important clues for future investigations into how to treat them. Today’s paper, “A random six-phase switch regulates pneumococcal virulence via global epigenetic changes,” was published in Nature Communications by scientists at the University of Leicester, University of Siena, University of Adelaide, and Griffith University. Senior authors…

Read More »

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Science Perspective: “Tracking Antibiotic Resistance”

In the current issue of Science there is an interesting Perspective by Scott Beatson and Mark Walker of the University of Queensland discussing research published this week in Science Translational Medicine by Conlan et al. who used SMRT® Sequencing to track plasmid diversity of hospital-associated infectious bacteria at the NIH Clinical Center. The article provides a nice overview of the paper, including an explanation of the important role that plasmids play in spreading antibiotic resistance. They illustrate why short-read DNA sequencing technologies are insufficient in resolving them and long reads are necessary for this work. “Plasmids may be viewed as…

Read More »

Monday, September 22, 2014

Maryland Scientists Produce High-Quality, Cost-Effective Genome Assembly of Loa loa Roundworm Using SMRT Sequencing

A paper just released in BMC Genomics details what authors call “the most complete filarial nematode assembly published thus far at a fraction of the cost of previous efforts.” The project was performed using the PacBio® RS II DNA Sequencing System by scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s Institute for Genome Sciences and the Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. In this genome sequencing effort, scientists generated a de novo assembly of Loa loa, a roundworm that infects humans. L. loa, transmitted to humans by deer flies, causes loiasis. The…

Read More »

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

NIH Study: Finished Genomes Provide Actionable Data to Combat Spread of Drug-Resistant Bacteria

A study launched over concerns around hospital-acquired infections has led to a recommendation for better microbial screening of patients upon admission. The research, from scientists at several NIH institutes, found that cases of hospital-acquired infection were less common than cases where patients were likely already colonized but received false negative results from basic screening. The study was made possible by Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT®) Sequencing, which allowed researchers to sequence plasmids and analyze their diversity and likely phylogeny. Short-read sequencing and strain-typing technologies could not provide the information necessary for a comprehensive analysis. “Single-molecule sequencing to track plasmid diversity of…

Read More »

Thursday, September 11, 2014

The Rise of Long Reads: Mendelspod Podcast Series

Mendelspod host Theral Timpson kicked off a new podcast series this week on long-read sequencing that will include interviews with luminaries in the genomics field. Check out this introductory article from Timpson for an explanation of why scientists are demanding longer reads to meet their research goals. The first interview is with Mike Snyder at Stanford, who has published recent papers in Nature Biotechnology and PNAS using Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT®) Sequencing for transcriptome analysis and demonstrated that long reads enable full coverage of RNA molecules. He discusses that work and his views on long-read sequencing and transcriptomics on the…

Read More »

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Genome Analysis of Unicellular Organism Reveals Frequent, Massive Reshuffling

A recent publication from senior author Laura Landweber at Princeton University offers a remarkable and unexpected look at sweeping genomic rearrangements in a unicellular organism. “The Architecture of a Scrambled Genome Reveals Massive Levels of Genomic Rearrangement during Development,” published in Cell, comes from lead authors Xiao Chen and John Bracht as well as other collaborators from Princeton, the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Benaroya Research Institute, and other institutions. The project focused on Oxytricha trifallax, a single-celled eukaryote that lives in ponds. Despite its unicellular simplicity, the organism has an extensive ability to scramble and rearrange its…

Read More »

Subscribe for blog updates:

Archives

Search

Categories

Press Release

PacBio Grants Equity Incentive Award to New Employee

Friday, December 3, 2021

Stay
Current

Visit our blog »