+

X

Quality Statement

Pacific Biosciences is committed to providing high-quality products that meet customer expectations and comply with regulations. We will achieve these goals by adhering to and maintaining an effective quality-management system designed to ensure product quality, performance, and safety.

X

Image Use Agreement

By downloading, copying, or making any use of the images located on this website (“Site”) you acknowledge that you have read and understand, and agree to, the terms of this Image Usage Agreement, as well as the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage, which together govern your use of the images as provided below. If you do not agree to such terms, do not download, copy or use the images in any way, unless you have written permission signed by an authorized Pacific Biosciences representative.

Subject to the terms of this Agreement and the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage (to the extent they do not conflict with the terms of this Agreement), you may use the images on the Site solely for (a) editorial use by press and/or industry analysts, (b) in connection with a normal, peer-reviewed, scientific publication, book or presentation, or the like. You may not alter or modify any image, in whole or in part, for any reason. You may not use any image in a manner that misrepresents the associated Pacific Biosciences product, service or technology or any associated characteristics, data, or properties thereof. You also may not use any image in a manner that denotes some representation or warranty (express, implied or statutory) from Pacific Biosciences of the product, service or technology. The rights granted by this Agreement are personal to you and are not transferable by you to another party.

You, and not Pacific Biosciences, are responsible for your use of the images. You acknowledge and agree that any misuse of the images or breach of this Agreement will cause Pacific Biosciences irreparable harm. Pacific Biosciences is either an owner or licensee of the image, and not an agent for the owner. You agree to give Pacific Biosciences a credit line as follows: "Courtesy of Pacific Biosciences of California, Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA" and also include any other credits or acknowledgments noted by Pacific Biosciences. You must include any copyright notice originally included with the images on all copies.

IMAGES ARE PROVIDED BY Pacific Biosciences ON AN "AS-IS" BASIS. Pacific Biosciences DISCLAIMS ALL REPRESENTATIONS AND WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, NON-INFRINGEMENT, OWNERSHIP, MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. IN NO EVENT SHALL Pacific Biosciences BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, PUNITIVE, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OF ANY KIND WHATSOEVER WITH RESPECT TO THE IMAGES.

You agree that Pacific Biosciences may terminate your access to and use of the images located on the PacificBiosciences.com website at any time and without prior notice, if it considers you to have violated any of the terms of this Image Use Agreement. You agree to indemnify, defend and hold harmless Pacific Biosciences, its officers, directors, employees, agents, licensors, suppliers and any third party information providers to the Site from and against all losses, expenses, damages and costs, including reasonable attorneys' fees, resulting from any violation by you of the terms of this Image Use Agreement or Pacific Biosciences' termination of your access to or use of the Site. Termination will not affect Pacific Biosciences’ rights or your obligations which accrued before the termination.

I have read and understand, and agree to, the Image Usage Agreement.

I disagree and would like to return to the Pacific Biosciences home page.

Pacific Biosciences
Contact:
Monday, March 27, 2017

Scientists Confirm Transplant-Associated Infection with SMRT Sequencing

[caption id="attachment_14022" align="alignright" width="300"] Image of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus courtesy of CDC/ Janice Haney Carr[/caption] A new PLoS One publication cites the use of SMRT Sequencing to clarify the transmission path of infection in a transplant recipient. This work is an excellent example of the clinical utility offered by long-read PacBio sequencing. The project was spurred by the frustrating inability to distinguish between hospital-acquired infections and donor-to-recipient infections through solid organ transplants. Scientists and clinicians from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the University of Texas Medical School teamed up to apply advanced sequencing technologies in the case…

Read More »

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

New Goat Genome Assembly Breaks Continuity Record, Expands Breeding Tools

[caption id="attachment_14004" align="alignright" width="300"] Photo of San Clemente Island goat kids by Cliff, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons[/caption] Efforts to produce a reference-grade goat genome assembly for improved breeding programs have paid off. A new Nature Genetics publication reports a high-quality, highly contiguous assembly that can be used to develop genotyping tools for quick, reliable analysis of traits such as milk and meat quality or adaptation to harsh environments. The program also offers a look at how different scaffolding approaches perform with SMRT Sequencing data. “Single-molecule sequencing and chromatin conformation capture enable de novo reference assembly of the domestic goat genome” comes from…

Read More »

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

High-Quality, Chromosome-Scale Quinoa Genome Valuable for Breeding Better Crops

A new genome assembly has remarkable promise to boost the global food supply. Scientists from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology and other institutions sequenced quinoa, a nutritious grain that can grow in marginal lands and other suboptimal environments. Their assembly offers new clues that could help improve breeding efforts to make the plant more accessible worldwide. “The genome of Chenopodium quinoa” was published recently in Nature by lead author David Jarvis, senior author Mark Tester, and a large group of collaborators. They focused on this plant, which is believed to have been domesticated more than 7,000 years ago in…

Read More »

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

AGBT 2017, Day 1: Infectious Disease and Improved Genome Assemblies

We’re thrilled to be at the AGBT conference this week, taking place this year in Hollywood, Fla. On the first full day of the meeting, everyone’s mandatory wristbands look shiny and new (we suspect by the end of the week they’ll be as wilted as us). And we've even been getting that work/life balance down thanks to some beach volleyball with our friends from BioNano Genomics and Swift Biosciences. At the opening session on Monday, Eimear Kenny from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai showed why it’s essential to fully understand natural genetic diversity in a fascinating talk…

Read More »

Thursday, May 12, 2016

From Seabass to Salmon:
Swimming in High-Quality Genomes

[caption id="attachment_12027" align="alignright" width="300"] Asian seabass[/caption] A global collaboration of researchers has produced what is likely the most contiguous assembly of a fish genome to date. “Chromosomal-Level Assembly of the Asian Seabass Genome Using Long Sequence Reads and Multi-layered Scaffolding,” published in PLoS Genetics, comes from lead author Shubha Vij and senior author László Orbán with collaborators at nearly two dozen labs. The team set out to sequence Lates calcarifer, the Asian seabass, which has a genome of about 670 Mb grouped into 24 A chromosomes and as many as 10 B chromosomes. They used SMRT Sequencing from PacBio to overcome…

Read More »

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Genome and Transcriptome Analysis Help Scientists Deconstruct Cancer Complexity

At Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, scientists used SMRT® Sequencing to decode one of the most challenging cancer genomes ever encountered. Along the way, they built a portfolio of open-access analysis tools that will help researchers everywhere make structural variation discoveries with long-read sequencing data. When Mike Schatz realized a few years ago that his PacBio® System had reached the throughput needed to process human genomes, he decided to give it a real challenge: the incredibly complicated, massively rearranged SK-BR-3 breast cancer cell line. The genome consists of 80 chromosomes, and that’s just the tip of the complexity iceberg. “We were…

Read More »

Thursday, March 31, 2016

With Greater Contiguity, New Gorilla Genome Assembly Offers Insights into Gene Content, SVs, and More

In a Science paper published today, scientists from the University of Washington, the McDonnell Genome Institute, and other organizations present a new gorilla genome assembly generated with PacBio long-read sequencing, representing an over 150-fold improvement over previous assemblies. From lead authors David Gordon, John Huddleston, Mark Chaisson, and Christopher Hill, and senior author Evan Eichler, the paper reports that the new assembly recovers nearly all reference exons missing from the previous assembly, and provides an unprecedented look at structural variation, genetic diversity, ancestral evolution, repeat structures, and more. The project was launched to address shortcomings with the existing gorilla assembly,…

Read More »

Monday, February 22, 2016

AGBT Day 4: A Better Gorilla Assembly, and Data from the Sequel System

On the final day of AGBT, attendees strapped in for the last talks of the conference before the ’80s-themed dance party to close out the meeting. Two of those talks focused on SMRT Sequencing, one including new data from our Sequel System. Christopher Hill from the Eichler lab at the University of Washington gave a fascinating talk on creating reference-grade assemblies for the great ape species. These resources will be incredibly helpful for shedding light on biological mechanisms behind speech, disease, neurological behavior, and other traits that separate us from our closest primate relatives. Current assemblies for these apes — including bonobo,…

Read More »

Tuesday, October 20, 2015

Scientists Reveal Recent Autosome-to-Y Duplication Event in Drosophila

Following on the heels of characterizing 18 Mst77Y genes that were tandemly duplicated within a 96 kb region (Krsticevic FJ, et al., 2015), scientists from institutes in Brazil, Austria, and the United States recently published a study in which they also used the Drosophila melanogaster data release from PacBio to characterize a region of the Y chromosome that had never before been accessible. In a paper published in PNAS, entitled “Birth of a new gene on the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster,” lead author Antonio Bernardo Carvalho, senior author Andrew Clark, and collaborators detail their find of a gene duplicated from…

Read More »

Thursday, October 15, 2015

ASHG 2015: Highlights from the Platinum Genome Session and More

During the final days of the ASHG meeting last week in Baltimore, a number of scientists offered great presentations based on data generated with SMRT Sequencing, including an entire session on building platinum genomes. We’ve rounded up the highlights here: Karyn Meltz Steinberg from Washington University’s McDonnell Genome Institute spoke about building a platinum human assembly from single-haplotype genomes. Her team defines “platinum” as covering at least 98% of the sequence with every contig associated with a chromosome. They use long-read PacBio sequencing for de novo sequencing and assembly, followed by scaffolding with BioNano Genomics or Dovetail Genomics technology. When…

Read More »

Thursday, August 20, 2015

The Gapless Assembly: Scientists Describe Workflow for Producing Complete Eukaryote Genome

Sunflowers with verticillium wilt caused by V. dahliaeIn a new mBio publication, scientists from Wageningen University and KeyGene in The Netherlands report results from several strategies used to assemble the genome of a filamentous fungus, and describe the specific pipeline they recommend for sequencing and assembling eukaryotic genomes.“Single-Molecule Real-Time Sequencing Combined with Optical Mapping Yields Completely Finished Fungal Genome” comes from lead authors Luigi Faino and Michael Seidl, senior author Bart Thomma, and collaborators. Using Verticillium dahliae as a model, which is a plant pathogen responsible for the damaging verticillium wilt disease in many crop species, they compared short-read and…

Read More »

Thursday, July 9, 2015

The Festival of Genomics Review: A Celebration of Long Reads

At the inaugural Festival of Genomics event in Boston, more than 1,500 people turned out to see what was billed as a conference unlike any other. The meeting was indeed unique, featuring a play (starring well-known scientists), a giant chess board, and a Genome Dome, in addition to the more familiar lineup of excellent speakers and workshops. To help kick off the festival, genomic luminaries Craig Venter and James Lupski presented plenary talks on day 1 and set the stage for some exciting science to follow. Lupski’s talk was particularly impactful, as he described how his team at Baylor recently…

Read More »

Monday, June 29, 2015

Nature Methods Paper Uses Long-Read Data for Highly Contiguous Diploid Human Genome

A new publication in Nature Methods describes a new single-molecule assembly approach that resulted in “the most contiguous clone-free human genome assembly to date,” according to lead authors Matthew Pendleton, Robert Sebra, Andy Pang, and Ajay Ummat. The paper, “Assembly and Diploid Architecture of an Individual Human Genome via Single Molecule Technologies,” comes from a large team of collaborators at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Cornell, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, and other institutions. Their new approach leverages the best aspects of each single-molecule data type by combining long-read sequencing for de novo assembly with single-molecule genome maps…

Read More »

Tuesday, June 9, 2015

Attend Our Worldwide User Meetings & SMRT Informatics Developers Conference

If you’d like to hear about the latest applications of SMRT® Sequencing from users, we have several events coming up. Our worldwide user group meetings and workshops feature PacBio users sharing their latest research, tips, and protocols, as well as our staff providing training and updates on products and methods to optimize your research. We’re always humbled by the quality and variety of science presented at these meetings. And for the bioinformatics crowd, we have a new event in August focused on developing new analytical tools for PacBio® data. Here’s more detail on each event, including registration details: Americas East…

Read More »

Tuesday, June 2, 2015

In Assembler Evaluation, Scientists Recommend Non-hybrid Approach to Bacterial Genomes

A new publication in Nature Scientific Reports recommends using only the PacBio® system to sequence bacterial genomes for the best chance of generating an accurate and finished assembly. The paper, “Completing bacterial genome assemblies: strategy and performance comparisons,” reviews several different long-read assembly methods for bacterial genomes. Authors Yu-Chieh Liao, Shu-Hung Lin, and Hsin-Hung Lin from the Institute of Population Health Sciences in Taiwan note that while several methods exist, efforts to evaluate and compare them have been insufficient. They set out to thoroughly assess these methods, which include hybrid assembly protocols as well as long-read-only protocols. Long-read technology appealed…

Read More »

1 2 3 4

Subscribe for blog updates:

Archives