+

X

Quality Statement

Pacific Biosciences is committed to providing high-quality products that meet customer expectations and comply with regulations. We will achieve these goals by adhering to and maintaining an effective quality-management system designed to ensure product quality, performance, and safety.

X

Image Use Agreement

By downloading, copying, or making any use of the images located on this website (“Site”) you acknowledge that you have read and understand, and agree to, the terms of this Image Usage Agreement, as well as the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage, which together govern your use of the images as provided below. If you do not agree to such terms, do not download, copy or use the images in any way, unless you have written permission signed by an authorized Pacific Biosciences representative.

Subject to the terms of this Agreement and the terms provided on the Legal Notices webpage (to the extent they do not conflict with the terms of this Agreement), you may use the images on the Site solely for (a) editorial use by press and/or industry analysts, (b) in connection with a normal, peer-reviewed, scientific publication, book or presentation, or the like. You may not alter or modify any image, in whole or in part, for any reason. You may not use any image in a manner that misrepresents the associated Pacific Biosciences product, service or technology or any associated characteristics, data, or properties thereof. You also may not use any image in a manner that denotes some representation or warranty (express, implied or statutory) from Pacific Biosciences of the product, service or technology. The rights granted by this Agreement are personal to you and are not transferable by you to another party.

You, and not Pacific Biosciences, are responsible for your use of the images. You acknowledge and agree that any misuse of the images or breach of this Agreement will cause Pacific Biosciences irreparable harm. Pacific Biosciences is either an owner or licensee of the image, and not an agent for the owner. You agree to give Pacific Biosciences a credit line as follows: "Courtesy of Pacific Biosciences of California, Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA" and also include any other credits or acknowledgments noted by Pacific Biosciences. You must include any copyright notice originally included with the images on all copies.

IMAGES ARE PROVIDED BY Pacific Biosciences ON AN "AS-IS" BASIS. Pacific Biosciences DISCLAIMS ALL REPRESENTATIONS AND WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, NON-INFRINGEMENT, OWNERSHIP, MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. IN NO EVENT SHALL Pacific Biosciences BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, PUNITIVE, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OF ANY KIND WHATSOEVER WITH RESPECT TO THE IMAGES.

You agree that Pacific Biosciences may terminate your access to and use of the images located on the PacificBiosciences.com website at any time and without prior notice, if it considers you to have violated any of the terms of this Image Use Agreement. You agree to indemnify, defend and hold harmless Pacific Biosciences, its officers, directors, employees, agents, licensors, suppliers and any third party information providers to the Site from and against all losses, expenses, damages and costs, including reasonable attorneys' fees, resulting from any violation by you of the terms of this Image Use Agreement or Pacific Biosciences' termination of your access to or use of the Site. Termination will not affect Pacific Biosciences’ rights or your obligations which accrued before the termination.

I have read and understand, and agree to, the Image Usage Agreement.

I disagree and would like to return to the Pacific Biosciences home page.

Pacific Biosciences
Contact:

Population Genomics Study Shows Faster Evolution in Domesticated Yeast

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Photo from Rising Damp (Flickr)

In a Nature Genetics paper, scientists used SMRT Sequencing to detect and compare structural variations in several yeast strains in order to understand evolutionary genome dynamics. They found different rates of evolution among domesticated and wild strains, and suggest that “the influence of human activities” could explain this.

Contrasting evolutionary genome dynamics between domesticated and wild yeasts” comes from lead author Jia-Xing Yue, senior author Gianni Liti, and collaborators at the Université Côte d’Azur, the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, and other institutes. Choosing long reads to facilitate accurate detection of structural variants, they used PacBio sequencing and generated “end-to-end genome assemblies for 12 strains representing major subpopulations of the partially domesticated yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its wild relative Saccharomyces paradoxus,” the scientists report. “The raw PacBio de novo assemblies of both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes showed compelling completeness and accuracy, with most chromosomes assembled into single contigs, and highly complex regions accurately assembled.”

According to the team, the final 12 assemblies provided “unprecedented resolution” for analyzing subtelomeric regions, which yielded a detailed look at evolutionary genome dynamics. “In chromosomal cores, S. paradoxus shows faster accumulation of balanced rearrangements (inversions, reciprocal translocations and transpositions), whereas S. cerevisiae accumulates unbalanced rearrangements (novel insertions, deletions and duplications) more rapidly,” the scientists write. “In subtelomeres, both species show extensive interchromosomal reshuffling, with a higher tempo in S. cerevisiae.” The accelerated evolution in baker’s yeast is likely to be at least partly a function of human activity and the human-associated environments to which the organisms have been exposed, they add.

The authors note that this study is an indicator of the utility of SMRT Sequencing for population genomics. Ultimately, they say, their results offer an intriguing new explanation for “why S. cerevisiae, but not its wild relative, is one of our most biotechnologically important organisms.”

Subscribe for blog updates:

Archives