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Friday, December 18, 2015

Case Study: With SMRT Sequencing for genomes, transcriptomes, and epigenomes, scientists are overcoming barriers in plant and animal research

Scientists are utilizing long-read PacBio sequencing to provide uniquely comprehensive views of complex plant and animal genomes. These efforts are uncovering novel biological mechanisms, enabling progress in crop development, and much more. To date, scientists have published over 1000 papers with Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) Sequencing, many covering breakthroughs in the plant and animal sciences. In this case study, we look at examples in model organisms Drosophila and C. elegans and non-model organisms coffee, Oropeitum, danshen, and sugarbeet, where SMRT Sequencing has contributed to a more accurate understanding of biology. These efforts underscore the broad applicability of long-read sequencing in…

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Thursday, September 24, 2015

Case Study: Assembling high-quality human genomes – Beyond the ‘$1,000 genome’

Scientists from WashU, Macrogen, and Mount Sinai are using long-read sequencing with single-molecule, next-generation genome mapping to create gold-quality de novo assemblies of human genomes. Unbiased de novo assembled genomes also highlight the substantial amount of structural variation unique to individuals and populations, which cannot be accessed by short-read technologies that use a reference-based re-sequencing approach.

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Friday, April 17, 2015

Case Study: Scientists create gold standard plant and animal genomes with SMRT Sequencing.

From crop improvement to breeding healthier livestock to modeling human disease, scientists are using PacBio Sequencing to advance understanding of plant and animal genomes. In this article, we look at four examples of plant and animal genome references improved or made possible with SMRT Sequencing, including an early example of transcriptome sequencing of a chicken for improved annotation. These examples highlight insights gained with SMRT Sequencing that are missed with short-read data, such as complex regions or novel genes.

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Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Featured Interview: The Rise of Long Reads – Mike Snyder says long-read sequencing is critical to understanding the transcriptome.

Genomics luminary Mike Snyder, Profesor and Chair of the Genetics Department at Stanford University and Director of the Stanford Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine, has been making strides in gene expression studies for years. His latest advance: analyzing whole human transcriptomes, which he calls personal transcriptomes, to better understand gene activity in an individual. Snyder says this approach could one day become a crucial element in clinical care. Dr. Snyder has published recent papers in Nature Biotechnology and PNAS using Single Molecule, Real- Time (SMRT) Sequencing for transcriptome analysis and demonstrated that long reads enable full coverage of RNA molecules. Recently he talked…

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Monday, June 23, 2014

Case Study: SMRT Sequencing provides a first look at repeat expansion disorder sequence.

Scientists at UC Davis School of Medicine have used the PacBio RS to sequence a previously “unsequenceable” region of highly repetitive DNA on the X chromosome. Their research has provided a critical leap forward in understanding the genetic complexity of repeat expansion disorders such as Fragile X Syndrome. The new method provides a path towards the first accurate means of population screening for Fragile X Syndrome, which is the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability and the most common known genetic cause of autism.

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Thursday, June 27, 2013

Case Study: Cod genome assembly – long reads offer unique insight.

Scientists at the University of Oslo’s Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES) applied long PacBio reads to a genome that was proving particularly difficult to assemble. Today, sequencing problems associated with the Atlantic cod genome are a thing of the past — and researchers are using their new assembly as the foundation for a major resequencing effort that’s just getting started.

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